THE OPINIONS OF PHYSICS TEACHERS ON THE NATURE OF THE CONTENT OF PHYSICS SENIOR SECONDARY SYLLABI AND RESOURCES

TitleTHE OPINIONS OF PHYSICS TEACHERS ON THE NATURE OF THE CONTENT OF PHYSICS SENIOR SECONDARY SYLLABI AND RESOURCES
Publication TypeJournal Article
Year of Publication2005
AuthorsYandila, CD, Nkumba, MP, Kazoozu, M
JournalJournal of Baltic Science Education
Volume4
Issue1
Start Page70-83
Date PublishedMarch/2005
Type of ArticleOriginal article
ISSN1648-3898
Other NumbersICID: 452544
Keywordsthe content of physics syllabi and resources
Abstract

The purpose of this study was to find out the opinions of physics teachers on the nature of BGCSE physics syllabi in Single Science, Double Science and Pure Science in the areas of their: (i) content (ii) objectives (iii) teaching methods (iv) differentiation teaching (v) assessment (vi) teaching orientation (viii) availability of computers (ix) student projects (x) laboratory facilities (xi) duration of the programme and (xii) laboratory assistants. A 38-item open-ended questionnaire was completed by 22 senior secondary school physics teachers. The results showed the need to revise the content, and assessment practices and those teachers were trying to promote learner-centered approach, even though they were faced with problems.
The study suggests the reduction of physics topics and objectives in each of the three physics syllabi. The two-year duration of the programme should be increased to three years to ensure that the content is covered adequately. The students should be placed into Pure, Double and Single Science on the basis of their performance in Form 3 examinations. Most physics teachers considered it realistic to expect students to acquire the four process skills of: (i) using and organizing techniques, apparatus and materials, (ii) observing, measuring and recording, (iii) handling experimental observations and data and (iv) planning investigations in two years. The commonly employed teaching methods included class discussion, group discussion and class presentation, practical work (individual/group), questioning (question/answer), assignment (class and home work), and worksheet-guidelines for performing experiments. Some physics teachers favoured the assessment system in which students’ final course grade is based on the ratio of 20% continuous assessment to 80% final examinations. Though most physics teachers are computer literate, their departments are not adequately equipped with functional computers for use in word processing and record keeping. Most physics teachers were of the opinion that it was possible for students to do projects in two years. Most physics teachers said that their physics laboratories were inadequately equipped with facilities to enable students to carry out individual practical work. They lacked trained technicians to assist teachers in setting up and running practical sessions.

URLhttp://journals.indexcopernicus.com/abstracted.php?level=5&icid=452544
Refereed DesignationRefereed