ASSESSMENT OF SCIENCE TEACHERS’ CAREER SATISFACTION AND SCHOOL ORGANISATIONAL CLIMATE IN ENHANCING JOB PERFORMANCE IN RURAL LEARNING ECOLOGIES

TitleASSESSMENT OF SCIENCE TEACHERS’ CAREER SATISFACTION AND SCHOOL ORGANISATIONAL CLIMATE IN ENHANCING JOB PERFORMANCE IN RURAL LEARNING ECOLOGIES
Publication TypeJournal Article
Year of Publication2019
AuthorsFaremi, YA, Jita, LC
JournalProblems of Education in the 21st Century
Volume77
Issue2
Start Page254-269
PaginationContinuous
Date PublishedApril/2019
Type of ArticleOriginal article
ISSN1822-7864
Other NumbersE-ISSN 2538-7111
Keywordsrural learning ecologies, school organisational climate, science education, teachers’ career satisfaction, teachers’ job performance
Abstract

Science teachers' career satisfaction and organisational climate, which influence their job performances, are very important. This research examined the extent to which science teachers' career satisfaction and organisational climate are related to their job performances in rural learning ecologies. Within a survey and correlational research design of a quantitative type, 250 science teachers were selected in Ondo State, Nigeria using a purposive sampling technique. Data were collected using an adapted questionnaire on science teachers' career satisfaction, school organisational climate and job performance. Descriptive and inferential statistics were used to analyse data. The results showed that 65.2% of the science teachers in rural learning ecologies were satisfied with their careers while 34.8% were dissatisfied with their careers. It was discovered that a combination of career satisfaction and organisational climate significantly influenced their job performances. It was found that the teachers’ career satisfaction had a significant positive effect on their job performances while school organisational climate had a significant negative effect on their job performances. In light of the results, it can be concluded that science teachers' career satisfaction is the most effective significant contribution to their job performances. Further, it can be inferred that the school organisational climate does not significantly predict job performance in rural learning ecologies. To this end, results of the current research have some implications worth considering for the employers of science teachers, principals of schools and other stakeholders in creating a healthy school organisational climate and demonstrate good leadership behaviour in order to achieve improvement in the job performance of science teachers in rural learning ecologies.

URLhttp://oaji.net/articles/2019/457-1556863871.pdf
DOI10.33225/pec/19.77.254
Refereed DesignationRefereed
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