GEOGRAPHICAL EDUCATION: PAST EXPERIENCE, CURRENT TRENDS AND FUTURE CHALLENGES

TitleGEOGRAPHICAL EDUCATION: PAST EXPERIENCE, CURRENT TRENDS AND FUTURE CHALLENGES
Publication TypeJournal Article
Year of Publication2011
AuthorsSonia Vanzella Castellar, Moreno, N, Arroio, A
JournalProblems of Education in the 21st Century
Volume27
Start Page5-8
Date PublishedMarch/2011
Type of ArticleEditorial
ISSN1822-7864
Other NumbersICID: 937743
Keywordsgeography education, teaching of geography
Abstract

It was in the context of the meeting of learning and concern that took place at the XI Encontro de Geógrafos da América Latina –EGAL- (Meeting of Geographers of Latin America) - located in the city of Bogotá, Colombia, from the 26th. to the 30th. of March 2007, that REDLADGEO was set up with various Latin American researchers. The intention was to create real and virtual spaces in which to present the results of academic research and organize joint investigative projects to strengthen, in the countries of origin, the line of research in Geography Teaching/Geography Education. Therefore, the origin of the network is based on the interest expressed by Latin American academicians and institutions with a central preoccupation: the teaching of geography, its tendencies, problems and possibilities among others to amplify its field of incidence and participation to international level, reflection and theories that favor the permanent constructive action of researchers in Geography Education.
The problems observed in the classroom lead us think about the manner of teaching and how the students learn. The questioning in common among researchers of various countries also addressed the difficulties in the reading and writing of the students and in respect of geography, how they do not perceive the space in which they live, understand spatial relationships or adequately locate themselves in the place in which they live. Understanding themselves spatially could stimulate students to read a map and recognize elements of the reality in which they live. Many of the experiences presented at the meetings and seminaries show that in general, basic education students, often including the teachers, are not able for example to read a map – its keys –, although for geography this reading is important for the understanding of other geographical concepts. That is, the map has a language that needs to be understood, as in the text of any literary genre, therefore the students need to become geographically and at the same time scientifically literate.

URLhttp://journals.indexcopernicus.com/abstract.php?icid=937743
Refereed DesignationRefereed
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