THE RELEVANCE OF EVOCATION AND REFLECTION CARDS IN THE LEARNING PROCESS

TitleTHE RELEVANCE OF EVOCATION AND REFLECTION CARDS IN THE LEARNING PROCESS
Publication TypeJournal Article
Year of Publication2012
AuthorsPiht, S, Lehiste, P, Raus, R, Lazarev, M
JournalProblems of Education in the 21st Century
Volume41
Start Page61-74
Date PublishedApril/2012
Type of ArticleOriginal article
ISSN1822-7864
Other NumbersICID: 990603
Keywordsevocation, learning motivation
Abstract

When starting school, most students have a desire to learn and are motivated to participate actively in the learning process. Lack of interest is what undermines learning. Research on children's well-being in the European Union (EU), conducted at York University in 2006, indicated that Estonia stands out among 25 EU countries with the lowest level of students who enjoy school and have a feeling of well-being. However, the results of 2006 and 2009 PISA (Programme for International Student Assessment) research indicate that Estonian students do have good subject knowledge and study skills.
The Estonian Human Development Report 2009 states that 70% of Estonian students consider their study load too heavy, 67% feel fatigue and 33% do not want to go to school at all. The report indicates that schools do not pay enough attention to personality development, analysis and discussion (Eesti Koostöö Kogu, 2010). Based on the results of the above-mentioned research, it can be said that Estonian students have good subject knowledge, but learning offers them neither pleasure nor interest (Organisation for Economic Cooperation and Development [OECD], 2007; Puksand, Lepmann & Henno, 2010).
The key question for this research was how learner-centered goal setting and reflection support the learners´ skills to set their own goals for the learning process and to analyze it. Learners are interested in the learning process in case they understand the goals, are actively involved, and take responsibility for their actions. Learners should experience success and get immediate feedback on their activities.
Ninety-six different evocation and reflection cards were tested by 24 Estonian teachers in the spring of 2011. The purpose of testing was to clarify how effective the usage of evocation and reflection cards is in supporting students in setting goals and analysing their activities. The quantitative research method (in the form of a questionnaire) was used in order to discover teachers` personal opinions, attitudes and approach to the cards and make conclusions about the relevance of the cards in supporting students` involvement in the evocation and reflection phase of learning.

URLhttp://journals.indexcopernicus.com/abstract.php?icid=990603
Refereed DesignationRefereed
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